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Prairie Dog Will Not Reopen for Dine-In on May 14

Prairie Dog Brewing will remain closed for dine-in service beyond May 14, 2020, regardless of the provincial easing of COVID-19-related restrictions.
Click here to see why we aren’t reopening yet.

On May 1, 2020, the Province of Alberta announced that as of May 14th, restaurants will be allowed to reopen for dine-in service with 50% occupancy restrictions, assuming no major increase in COVID-19 infection rates or other related concerns, commencing phase 1 of a staged plan for the gradual elimination of related restrictions placed on businesses and individuals throughout our province. [Edit: On May 13th, the province further delayed Calgary and Brooks’ phase 1 to May 25, 2020].

Since that announcement, dozens of you have reached out to ask us what we are planning. To be honest, we expected the relaxation of these restrictions to come much later, and along with many of our industry friends, we are very apprehensive about reopening to dine-in services on May 14th. With formally-published guidelines for restaurants only being released on May 11th, and with only two weeks after the public announcement to strategize on what reopening would look like for us, we have decided to remain closed to dine-in services at this time. We feel this is the best call for both our staff and customers, especially after observing the experiences at businesses that have tried to reopen elsewhere, where staff have been verbally abused and even violently attacked by customers while trying to enforce legally-mandated physical distancing, mask use, and other restrictions that remain in place post-reopening.

While the date we reopen for dine-in service is still under discussion, we appreciate your continued support through the takeout and delivery services we currently offer.

Featured

Six Frustrating Challenges to Reopening a Restaurant in the COVID-19 Era

[UPDATE MAY 22, 2020]: When we published this article a week ago, the 16th of May, we hoped that it would be found by a few other restauranteurs and let them know that they aren’t alone, and that the public who regularly follow us would gain some insight into our challenges. However, this article has since been shared all across Canada and even had respectable readership from the United States, viewed over 80,000 times by more than 61,000 people worldwide. It has been shared and reposted on social media hundreds, if not thousands of times, and we’ve spend much of the past week attempting to catalog and answer replies on this post and across various platforms, as well as fielding phone calls and conducting interviews with the press. This post was the top thread on the Calgary sub-Reddit for a while, and placed highly on the Alberta sub-Reddit, as well.

We could have never guessed that our transparency would resonate so strongly with so many people, and we have to thank all of you who’ve left comments, forwarded along to friends, purchased takeout or ordered us for delivery, etc. We especially appreciate the incredible level of positivity and constructive feedback people have given us about this article. Eventually we hope to make a follow-up article to talk about all of the wonderful ideas people have come up with about how to deal with these challenges, including what approaches we decide to take.

A small sample of the press highlights of the past few days:

[END MAY 22 UPDATE]

We are now at a turning point in the COVID-19 pandemic crisis, where measures taken to flatten the curve are starting to demonstrate that they’re working. Governments have begun to recognize the full economic and societal impacts of the restrictions they placed on their citizens and businesses, and are quickly starting to regroup as they face the daunting prospect of trying to rebuild an economy after 10-30% of small businesses have been forced to permanently close, and unemployment rates begin to approach and even surpass those of the Great Depression, which took a full decade and a world war to recover from.

While Prairie Dog has opted to remain closed for dine-in operations after May 14, 2020 (and very likely past the updated May 25th date announced on May 13), we do plan to eventually reopen. Ever since the May 1st announcement about restaurants reopening, people have been asking us over and over if we’ll be opening on the 14th. It can be difficult to adequately address the various challenges to doing so in a few comments on the phone or in person. When we do finally reopen, guests should expect a very different experience compared to what we were able to provide before. This article attempts to explain the complex and difficult situation we, as restaurant owners, are in when considering reopening to the public for dine-in.

It appears that our government wants to get out of the way of business as quickly as possible and leave most of the details in the hands of the business owner, which is great on one hand, but that means you could have a very different experience at different restaurants based on how seriously each restauranteur or restaurant ownership group takes the threat of COVID-19 to their staff and customers, and how they choose to approach the situation. Desperation leads to risk taking, and in this economic climate, many service-industry businesses are already in a desperate struggle to survive.

That said, what are some of the key points we are considering when thinking about reopening?

Continue reading

Press Release: Prairie Dog Brewpub Closed for Dine-In Service

Effective Wednesday, March 18, 2020, Prairie Dog Brewing has closed its doors to the public for both dine-in service and takeout/off-sales, due to the COVID-19 pandemic. We plan to reopen in late March 2020 as a takeout/delivery operation, only. All dine-in services will be suspended until after the pandemic sufficiently clears.

[UPDATE: We reopened for takeout on March 26, 2020, with new delivery services coming online thereafter]

Unfortunately, this decision required us to temporarily lay off 19 members of our talented staff. We intend to rehire all of these wonderful people when full operations resume at some point in the future.

Please review the following material for more information about why we had to close and what our plans are for takeout and delivery:

  • Brewpub Closure and financial information, including what you can do to help.
  • Our Takeout Menu, which includes information about takeout beer, food and beverages.
  • Our Delivery page, which lists online delivery services that you can use to have our food and beer delivered directly to your home or office.

PRESS RELEASE: COVID-19 PUBLIC ANNOUNCEMENT

Attention all guests of Prairie Dog Brewing:

We would like to provide some information about how Prairie Dog is responding to the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. We have been closely monitoring the progression of the disease since December, and have been preparing for several weeks for its eventual presence in Alberta.

We take the health and welfare of our guests and staff extremely seriously, so although the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) has assessed the public health risk associated with COVID-19 as “low” in Alberta and across Canada, any guest or staff member that shows signs of illness (coughing, sneezing, runny nose, etc.) will be asked to leave immediately.

At Prairie Dog Brewing, we’ve always maintained a very high standard of cleanliness and sanitation, but to be certain that we aren’t giving this virus any opportunities for transmission, we are taking several additional precautions.

Precautions we have already taken:

  • Validating that our high-temperature dishwashing machines are effective against coronaviruses.
  • Switching our multi-quat sanitizer to a chlorine-based disinfectant that is effective against COVID-19.
  • We’ve increased both the frequency and intensity of sanitizing/disinfection protocols for high-touch surfaces like payment terminals, menus, bathrooms, door knobs, and light switches.
  • We have brought in easy-to-sanitize on-table dispensers that minimize napkin exposure to potential airborne pathogens.
  • We have removed our board games and card games because we cannot thoroughly sanitize them.
  • We have added signage in all bathrooms regarding proper hand washing, and sent an all-staff bulletin with instructions to minimize the risk of transmission at our brewpub.
  • We are closely following Alberta Health Services and World Health Organization bulletins to ensure that we are taking appropriate precautions against disease transmission.

Precautions that will come into effect as of Friday, March 13th:

  • We will no longer be accepting cash (eww germs!) – please bring payment cards.
  • We will no longer be refilling customer growlers on the spot; instead:
    • We will exchange any Prairie Dog-branded growler that we find in suitable condition for one that we’ve already taken the time to thoroughly clean and sanitize, and will fill it with the beer of the customer’s choice at regular off-sale pricing.

Thank you for your support as we continue to monitor this extraordinary pandemic and make changes that support the health and safety of our team, guests and community. Please do what you can do to stay healthy!

For more information, please check out the resources assembled by the Calgary Chamber of Commerce at https://tinyurl.com/rjjsmjo.

  • Thank you from the team at Prairie Dog Brewing

Press Release: Electronic Staff Funds Collection

When Prairie Dog Brewing opened for business in June of 2018, we started with a bold plan to buck the traditions of the restaurant industry. First and foremost, we set out to compensate our staff fairly for their efforts, paying higher base wages and providing health and wellness benefits. Next, we developed an alternative to the archaic and sometimes discriminatory tipping model found at most other restaurants, which we call our Staff Fund.

Our “no tip expected” model has been extremely well received by Calgarians and out of town visitors, but as we anticipated, many guests would still like to provide a monetary reward to our staff as recognition for a great experience. To support our customers’ desire, we opened Prairie Dog Brewing with the option to contribute to our Staff Fund directly by “Buying us a beer” for $5, or by “Giving our brewmaster/pitmaster a high five” for $2, which would be added to the customer’s bill at some point prior to payment. Further, we disabled the tip function on our electronic payment terminals to encourage customers to formally contribute to the Staff Fund as described, and to spur on the conversation about our novel approach. Unfortunately, both our customers and our staff have found it awkward or untimely to broach the subject of the Staff Fund prior to payment. This has led to hundreds — it not thousands — of requests by our customers to find a way to use our electronic merchant terminals to collect Staff Funds, similar to tips.

Therefore, we are pleased to announce that as of today, February 10, 2020, we have enabled Staff Funds collection on our merchant terminals. In order to do this, we’ve turned on our merchant terminals’ tip function and provided clear labelling on the machines to indicate that tips are not expected and that all tips on these machines are a contribution to our Staff Fund, as well as placing a new “table talker” card on every table to outline our tipping policy and Staff Fund. 

We have also formalized our method of Staff Funds distribution. We distributed Staff Funds in a somewhat ad-hoc manner in the past, which meant that staff could not be certain of when or how they would receive Staff Funds. From today forward, we’ve committed to paying 75% of Staff Funds collected during each 2-week pay period directly on our employees’ paycheques. Prairie Dog Brewing operates as a team and every player has an important role to play in creating a great guest experience, so all of our employees will be included in this 75% distribution of funds, including our front of house, kitchen, brewery, and administration staff. These funds will be divided equally among the staff per hour that they work during each collection period. We will use the remaining 25% of collected Staff Funds for performance-based bonuses and rewards, as well as staff-driven events/initiatives and other perks.

Unchanged is our commitment to our staff and customers that Staff Funds will be paid out solely to Prairie Dog Brewing employees rather than to our ownership team, and that our employees will continue to receive industry-leading compensation and benefits.

For more information about our Staff Fund and our updated tipping policy, please visit http://tips.prairiedog.beer.

Beerfest 2018 Update

The first batch that we ran through Clifford, our BBQ pit, was the oats that we used in our breakfast pale ale collaboration with Last Best.

You should come to the Calgary International Beerfest this weekend, Friday and Saturday May 4th and 5th! We will be debuting nine casks that feature some of the favourite beer recipes we’ve developed over the past few years, and we are proud to announce that we will be serving kegs of our new collaboration with Last Best Brewing and Distilling and a three-way collaboration with Origin Brewing and Malting and Typeface Coffee Roasters. Not only that, but we’ll be bringing along barbecued meats prepared by Chef Jay in Clifford, the big red Texas BBQ pit!

We will be tapping casks on the following schedule at Beerfest, with special guests doing the honours:

Friday, May 4

4:30 PM – Best Bitter

This traditional English style is a sessionable favourite that elevates traditional English malts to centre stage and balances them out with a blend of Bramling Cross and Lemondrop hops, resulting in a unique mashup between the old and new worlds.

5:30 PM – Oatmeal Stout

A rich, dark stout with a thick, creamy head and full mouthfeel, having notes of coffee, caramel, dark chocolate, ash, and smoke character from our in-house-smoked flaked oats.

7:00 PM – Golden Strong

A surprisingly light and refreshing Belgian-style beer that belies its underlying strength. Yeast contribute a spicy, peppery character with notes of red apple. Biscuit-malt undertones and El Dorado hops give this beer an extra dose of flavour and dimension.

8:00 PM – Oaked Blackberry Porter

Prairie Dog’s favourite porter recipe with an addition of blackberry fruit and aged with French oak, leading to a beer with significant complexity and even wine-like characteristics.

Saturday, May 5

3:00 PM – Cinco de Mayo

This “Taco in a Glass” beer was inspired by the savoury flavours of Mexican food. Based roughly on the brown ale style, this beer has about 15% of its grist replaced with toasted flaked corn. Liberal additions of cumin, black pepper and smoked paprika give the beer flavours reminiscent of taco seasoning, and time spent with heavy-toast oak lends underlying complexity to this unique creation.

4:00 PM – IPA

An edgy, modern example of the American IPA category that bursts with lemon, orange and tangerine fruit character. A generous blend of Amarillo, Lemondrop and Mosaic hops were added at the end of boil and through multiple dry-hop steps, for a total of about 4lb of hops used per hectolitre (100L) of beer. In spite of the amazing hop character, bitterness is kept lower to allow the underlying malt flavour to shine through in the finish.

5:30 PM – Oat Mild

Prairie Dog’s take on a pale form of English Mild beer. Extremely sessionable with plenty of body and flavour from oats and other traditional British ingredients, which give subtle hints of toasted coconut.

7:00 PM – Gose Margarita

A fun take on the Gose style, which is a light, slightly tart and fruity German wheat ale style that incorporates coriander spices. Our version dials back the coriander and brings in freshly zested organic lime peels that have been soaked in tequila for sterilization and flavour reasons. This beer has all the fun of a margarita with less sugar and an easy-drinking character that makes it perfect for the patio!

8:00 PM – Dessert Stout

This easy-drinking beer was inspired by the flavours of waffle-cone ice cream and includes real Madagascar vanilla and a variety of other unique ingredients that make it the perfect after-dinner treat or a fun sipper around the campfire.

General Updates

Laura uses a router to trim the laminate countertop above the pony wall that separates the brewery from the dining room.

It has been many months since we our last update here and some people must be wondering, “what’s going on with those guys?”. The truth is that we’ve been quiet because we’ve been so busy with construction and starting up the business! Now, we’ve claimed time and time again that we would be opening in a short few months, and have repeatedly been disappointed by the reality that things just don’t happen as quickly as we’d like them to, suffering from the planning fallacy. However, every day marks progress and milestones continue to pass, and we are finally very close to gaining our occupancy license, which is the big hurdle that we need to jump over before we can start brewing beer and finally open our doors.

Right now it looks like we are about six weeks away from opening. I say that based on the fact that we are nearing the end of construction and starting to go through final inspections, and although we’ve had a few surprises, nothing major has come up. Here’s a few of the recent milestones:

  • On Tuesday, our kitchen was approved by Alberta Health Services for commercial purposes
  • A couple of weeks ago we fired up our boiler and turned on our brewhouse for the first time, moving around water and testing for leaks
  • Our federal excise tax inspection happened on Monday and all went smoothly
  • We had a progress inspection with our fire inspector and have completed all his recommendations
  • This week our mechanical contractors looked over all the plumbing fixtures that we installed and gave us some minor homework, but they believe everything is set to pass a final
  • Our electrical contractor finished up on Tuesday and will book our final inspection shortly
  • We had some setbacks and time sinks with the city planning office related to our painted signage plan, but that was resolved on Wednesday and our signage permit is now pending approval
  • We now have functioning wifi, an alarm system, payment terminals, refrigeration equipment, milling equipment, water softening and filtration, dishwashers, and lots more

Some of the major things that we still need to complete before we get occupancy (and start brewing beer):

  • The outside of our building has to be pressure washed and painted (by us) before we can get our Development Completion Permit
  • We must finish mounting bathroom doors and trim
  • We will install hardwood on the bar top and install drip trays
  • Our tap towers and draft lines will be set up and installed
  • Final inspections for electrical, mechanical, plumbing, and boiler
  • Assembly and placement of tables and chairs
  • Building and fire inspections

So as you can see, we have a lot of things to push through as soon as Beerfest finishes up, and we still have several tasks that could come up against roadblocks depending on bureaucracy. So wish us luck and please, if you are interested in volunteering to help us get things finished up, please send us an email at social@prairiedogbrewing.ca!

Hope to see you all at Beerfest!

January 2018 Progress Update

Jay took this high shot of the dining room, bar and outer kitchen walls. The bar and kitchen walls had been framed, and the short pony walls for our east dining room had started being installed. Floor grinding was ongoing in the visible floor area.

The past several months as a startup brewpub have been incredibly busy, exciting and scary all at once. We began major construction in early November, and have been working at a rapid pace ever since, with new developments and milestones occurring daily. So far our construction is running pretty much on schedule, but we Prairie Dog’ers are taking on pretty much all of the finishing/detail work, so we are anticipating an opening around April or May, assuming inspections, licensing and permitting go smoothly. Each founder has written a few thoughts below about the progress of the past few months and where we are headed.

Brewmaster Gerad

Gerad cut a specialized groove into 4×4 pressure-treated posts to form a waterproof base for our walk-in cooler walls. Here he is cleaning up the groove with a chisel to ensure a good fit. And don’t worry, these wall bases will be completely embedded in cement floor coving and covered by a cementitious urethane, keeping the food away from any chemicals in the pressure treated wood.

Whew! It is difficult to decide where to begin because there has been so much going on, so I’m just going to start by summarizing where we are at in construction right now.

As of earlier this week, all of our walls are framed and partially drywalled, and a substantial portion of our plumbing and electrical have been roughed in. HVAC and ducting is practically finished, and we framed in our bar over the past week, too. We’ve finished a lot of painting of the interior walls and beams with the help of several volunteers (wonderful people, they are), and contractors painted out our ceilings some time ago. Concrete floors are currently being ground and polished throughout the pub and look spectacular in the completed areas. We look forward to our brewery floor coatings being installed later this week, which will allow us to finally place our brewhouse and tanks, unblocking a large amount of work and giving us a chance to get familiarized with new equipment.

To make all that happen, we have more than a dozen trades working in the space at all times, and at the somewhat frenetic pace we’ve been working, it is easy to forget all our construction contributions as founders, which are a big part of what makes the brewpub uniquely us, not to mention saving a huge amount of cash (the only way we could afford to open at all). For example, right now I’m working on building cabinetry and a tap tower of our own design on a centre bar island that I also built, which stands over a pair of 10″ pipes that Tyler and I ran 3-feet down and over 100 feet to our beer cooler — a room that is 38 feet long, 18 feet wide, and 14′ tall, which we also designed and built from scratch together with the rest of our team and several volunteers. It feels really great to know that we are such a huge part of the project and get to leave our mark on a bit of everything. Last night I worked at the pub until 11pm wiring up pot lights in our vestibule, bathrooms and hallway, and earlier in the day I helped our structural welder add beams to the roof to help support our makeup air and glycol chilling units. Who knows what I’ll be up to tomorrow, that’s the fun of this wild ride.

Because we’ve been so deep in construction these past weeks, I haven’t had a ton of time to work on beer, but we were able to play with a lot of fun new recipes in the late fall and early winter, such as a pumpkin-spice beer, several different goses, an oat-based pale English mild, and a Mexico-inspired beer reminiscent of tacos. I look forward to playing with several more recipe variations over the coming weeks in preparation for our opening and the upcoming Calgary International Beerfest, where we plan to have a booth with real Prairie Dog beer and barbecue!

Here are some of my favourite pics from the last while:

Chef Jay

Jay has become our “lighting guy”, and this was part of the humble beginnings of that. Here he is test fitting components from the second-hand lamp posts we picked up and refurbished.

Now, more than ever, I try to get into the construction site early and stay late so that I can marvel at what we have been able to accomplish unencumbered by multiple trades workers. Day by day we inch closer to our opening date. Walls have been built, waiting for drywall. The bar has been framed, waiting to be finished and my kitchen is almost recognizable as a comfortable work space.

This is Clifford, our big red smoker/barbecue pit. This unit came straight out of Mesquite, Texas and is capable of barbecuing 1,800lbs of meat, veggies, etc at once.

Back in mid-December, we at Prairie Dog received an early Christmas present from Texas. It had finally arrived! Our kitchen showpiece, a large red BBQ pit whom we have affectionately named Clifford. I suggest you do a cursory Google search for “Clifford the Big Red Dog” if you are unfamiliar with the classic children’s book series. Clifford stands 9 feet high, almost 10 feet long and 6 feet wide. he weighs 6,700lbs empty and has a capacity of 1,800lbs. Needless to say, I am extremely excited to get him all plugged in and in working order. Because Clifford weighs so much, we needed a way to move him around the construction site until we were ready to sit him in his final resting place. We built what we like to call Clifford’s Bachelor Pad. It is essentially a 2×6 frame with several layers of fire-rated concrete board on top for heat protection.

I was fortunate enough to be able to go home to Ontario for 10 days around Christmas to spend time with my wonderful girlfriend, her family and even see my parents off before they traveled to Texas for the winter months. While bumming around Toronto, I was able to set up a meeting with Pitmaster Terrance Hill at the about-to-open Texas-style BBQ restaurant, Beach Hill Smokehouse. Terrance also has a similar model of the Oyler BBQ pit that we have here at Prairie Dog. He was kind enough to show me around his new restaurant and answer any questions I had about day to day operations of the smoker. He also provided valuable insight into the processes he had to endure having the smoker inspected and eventually approved for use.

Last Tuesday, Gerad, Tyler and I spent about 4 hours at the Sysco Calgary office and warehouse. We had a tour of the facility with the Food Safety Co-Ordinator and Business Development Manager. While there, we were shown the policies and procedures in place to ensure the highest food quality. Chef Chris had 5 or 6 menu ideas for us and made several great dishes for us in his test kitchen. We also spoke with the Protein Category Merchandiser to nail down our local options for beef, pork and chicken supplies. Having worked for Sysco for 3 years in Toronto, I am very familiar with the company, so this was a great opportunity for me to really add value to our company, and it is of utmost importance to me to structure this business relationship in a way that is honest and transparent.​

Here are some fun pics of Jay from the past several months:

Quality Director Sarah

The walls and ceiling throughout our space were all painted a dark teal green, which was really getting on our nerves and didn’t match our tastes at all. Here Sarah applies an espresso-coloured brown paint on our North wall, near the ceiling.

To do any job well, you need the right tools. Now, I won’t need to use a hammer to ensure consistent, high-quality beer (let’s hope, anyway…the head brewer is my husband…). What I do need, though, are instruments, processes, industry know-how and, you guessed it, math.

And where does one keep one’s tools? In a toolbox, of course. I am very excited that the brewery lab has been built! It has walls and a doorway. It doesn’t have a door yet, but there it stands, in the middle of it all. I have a wish list of equipment to populate it, with the most important pieces at the top so they’re first in line to be purchased as we can afford them. Just as the brewery has room to grow over time, I have a growth plan for the lab. I hope that a new round of government funding programs geared towards improving quality in food and beverage production in the province will include brewpubs like our own and help equip the lab sooner. Using tools is one thing, but making them is another. Once we are open, we will need an overall quality program in place, so I have been prioritizing working on the Quality Manual, and researching Good Manufacturing Practices (an overall approach to manufacturing which is standard in several industries, including the US brewing industry) and Good Production Practices to inform how quality should be managed.

Our quality lab has been framed and the exterior drywalled.

Now what’s all this about needing math in the toolbox? I recently researched statistics related to sensory studies. All breweries, from micro to macro, rely on sensory data from panelists to inform decisions about releasing beer. In small breweries, we rely on it heavily since we won’t have all the fancy testing equipment that larger breweries do. Sensory is something that on the surface can seem subjective but, with the right statistical methods applied, is in fact a science. Sensory is the most different aspect of quality control that I have learned about compared to my past life, and giving me some math to work with helps with the learning curve! This knowledge about sensory is another tool that I am eager to add to the quality program.

Head Brewer Tyler

Tyler at the helm of our trusty forklift, Wesley. Tyler is moving our glycol chiller outside to make room for other activities.

Since we last updated you, we have been incredibly busy! First, Beer!

Over the last couple of months, we have continued to brew pilot batches in my garage, in spite of the snowy weather and frigid temperatures. The smell of boiling wort has a way of softening even the most bitter of Calgary’s cold. In anticipation of a springtime opening, we have been brewing with an increased focus on beers that are refreshing, light, crisp, and a little off the beaten path. One beer that I’m very excited for is our Gose. It is a mildly sour and salty beer with a hint of citrus. It goes great on its own, but we’ve been playing with it, adding different flavour combinations to the base beer. We recently brewed a Tequila Lime Gose that tastes like a margarita and practically flew out of the keg. Through the holidays, we were very busy with construction and had to postpone a few brew days, but we’ve hit the reset button and are back on schedule to continue developing recipes.

We also now have all of our big pieces of brewing equipment in the building: our brew house, fermentors, brite tanks and other equipment. Although we haven’t been able to move any of these to their final homes yet, it sure is nice to see all that shiny stainless coming in to work. The brewhouse is like a giant lego set, that weighs hundreds of kilos, and carries liquid, and isn’t colourful, and isn’t made of plastic, and well… There are lots of parts and an instruction manual. Maybe it’s more like Meccano… but I digress.

We are now working on making sure we have all the necessary hoses, pumps, clamps, fittings, and other ancillary equipment to efficiently make beer. Hopefully by our next update, we’ll have some of that equipment placed and put together.

Until then,

Cheers from the brewery!

Marketing and PR Director, Laura

Laura and Gerad worked late into the night to get an early start on our bar cabinetry, where mug club members’ individualized beer mugs will be stored.

Since the last update I have been busy with social media efforts as well as other fun marketing things. We continue to average two new followers a day; we now have 926 followers on Instagram and 1,287 followers on twitter. We are also seeking out events for our founders to attend when possible to further the reach of Prairie Dog’s name, which has helped us network as well as get people excited for our opening.

In December, I ordered our first growlers and t-shirts! I am currently working with the print house on design iterations and other styles/colours of shirts and apparel for our opening. I fully expect to see people wearing Prairie Dog Brewing swag soon.

I also confirmed our first radio campaign, which is set to run from mid February until late March on X929. We have a meeting booked to work with their creative team with the overall objective of the campaign to create broader brand awareness outside the craft beer circle as well as integrate a separate marketing campaign that will kick off in February (more details to come).

A sampling of polymer clay tap handles sculpted by Laura.

I have been working on sculpting tap handles from polymer clay and experimenting with painting them; so far I am proud of how they are turning out and look forward to seeing them behind the bar. Another project I have started is designing posters and a campaign to promote our mug club. I had originally hoped to make all the steins for the Mug Club myself on the pottery wheel, but unfortunately that just isn’t going to work out. Don’t fear though, I have been researching and will procure unique mugs to be used by our mug club members. In the next couple of weeks I will complete the design and order gift cards to be used as promo items on X929 and to have available for purchase. I am also in talks with another graphic artist to help create imagery for posters, promotions, campaigns and potentially art around the brewpub.

Bye for now!

Beers Around the Table

Our team enjoying beers during the “Hump Day” celebrations at Village.

About two years ago, while we were in the very beginning stages of planning the brewpub (including the planning of our move from California to Calgary), we were researching our “competition” in Calgary — many of whom are now good friends. During that research we happened upon Cold Garden Brewing’s blog. At that time they were at the stage we are in currently: building, waiting on equipment, figuring out finances and all the other fun that comes during start-up. In one post, she pauses to tell a story of meeting Jim Button of Village, socializing at the brewery and about how friendly the craft beer industry is. During the story she tells of how at the end of the evening, Jim dug around in their utility closet to pull out a red card table, giving it to the folks of Cold Garden.

Jim Button telling the story of the card table that was their first board room table.

And so the journey of the Beer Planning Table began, an object that has been gaining a reputation in the local brewing community. Village was a startup not so long ago and when they were just getting started one of the team brought in an old card table to act as their board room table. It seemed to have brought the brewery luck and good fortune and Jim wanted to pass that on to another startup — and that startup was Cold Garden. Once we heard this story we became even more excited to be a part of and nurture the craft beer community in Calgary.

Once Cold Garden opened and found some success they, with Village, decided to pass it along to a new startup, choosing Common Crown as the next recipient. We have become friends with the guys up at Common Crown and can’t say enough good things about them. A couple months ago we were at a cask event supporting some amazing local breweries when the fellas at Common Crown pulled us all aside with Jim Button to tell us they had discussed who would be the next recipient of the beloved beer planning table, and they had decided on us.

Village, Cold Garden, Common Crown and Prairie Dog Brewing in camaraderie.

A few of us may have jumped up in giddy happiness that these other breweries see us as worthy of the table, or maybe they think we could really use the luck and good fortune that tends to follow the table!

Gerad talking about our brewpub and accepting the table.

Village hosted us during their “hump day” on September 6th with folks from Cold Garden and Common Crown. Jim told the story of the table and Gerad spoke about our brewpub plans and who we are. He also took the responsibility of drawing our name on the table top. It is an incredible feeling to know that these other breweries have confidence in us and in our potential for success.

Gerad making our mark in the table.

Something we have learned over the past year and a half is just how wonderful the craft beer community is in Calgary (and everywhere really); the people who are supposed to be competitors collaborate with each other and contribute to each others’ success. When we set our sights on Calgary as the location for our brewpub we envisioned ourselves working closely with other local breweries to foster a community that wouldn’t view each other as competition. We had no idea at that time if people would be receptive, heck, we didn’t even know if there would be anybody to work with! But we are so happy to see that Calgary’s beer scene is growing faster than any of us imagined, and that breweries like Village are working to build a community just as we envisioned ourselves doing one day. We are honoured to be the next recipients of this table, which has brought so much luck to our friends at Village, Cold Garden, and Common Crown, and we hope that it brings us as much good fortune as it did them.

The object of beauty and fortune!

The team each signing our names to the beer planning table in its new home at our brewery.

Announcing Our Brewpub Location

Rendering of the Prairie Dog Brewpub concept design

Rendering of the Prairie Dog Brewpub location concept design, looking southeast from the intersection at 58th Ave and Centre St.

Those of you that have followed our progress over the past year through this website may have noticed that we’ve been silent for a long time. We have been working on leasing a location since December 2016, but didn’t want to publicly announce anything about it until the City of Calgary approved our intended use as a brewery and restaurant — the final condition of our lease.We are pleased to announce that the City of Calgary has approved our development permit and change of use for our proposed brewpub location, 105 – 58th Ave SE Calgary.

The exciting/terrifying moment of signing the lease for our location.

So many signatures and initials needed!

With this final condition being removed we were able to officially sign the lease. The map below gives a general sense of where the location is relative to major roads and the South LRT line/Chinook Station.

Map of Prairie Dog Brewing's South-Calgary Brewpub.

The Prairie Dog Brewing South-Calgary Brewpub will be located at 105 – 58th Ave SE, on the corner of 58th Avenue and Centre Street, near the Chinook LRT station and Macleod Trail.

People familiar with the area might remember that St. John’s Music used to occupy this location (they’ve moved here). It is their former space that we’re leasing, and we are thrilled about this spot for a lot of reasons, but here are some highlights:

  • A South Calgary location – this area is extremely underserved by breweries, and especially by brewpubs
  • We are only a few blocks from the Chinook LRT station (about as close as Chinook Centre Mall is to the station)
  • We are very close to several major commuter roads – Macleod Trail, Glenmore Trail, and Blackfoot Trail, not to mention 58th and Centre St./Fairmount Drive, which are notable on their own
  • Our proximity to the communities along both Fairmount Drive and Elbow Drive, like Fairview, Acadia, Kingsland and Haysboro, whose residents can easily take those roads direct to our location (via 58th for the Elbow Dr. communities) without being significantly affected by rush hour traffic
  • We are a stone’s throw from The Vineyard homebrew shop, owned and operated by Papa Bam Bam, Neil Bamford, a staple of the Calgary homebrew scene and aficionado of both beer and smoked meats (a.k.a. external quality control)
  • We like our landlord

About the Location

This is what our future brewpub location looks like today, as viewed from the intersection of 58th and Centre St.

This is what our future brewpub location looks like today, as viewed from the intersection of 58th and Centre St.

This 12,000 square-foot building sits directly on the busy corner of 58th Ave and Centre Street, and features an impressive facade with high, curved parapets and cornices adorning its peaks. Directly beside our building are about 40 parking stalls accessible from either 58th or Centre St., with the majority being on the back (south) side. The building is attached on its east wall to a mall of commercial bays, which feature great local businesses like Canadian Woodworker and Bow Valley Kitchens. The remainder of the mall has an additional 50 parking stalls, which will make parking easier during busy evening/weekend periods (though we strongly encourage people to use the C-Train and services like taxis/Uber to travel to/from our establishment).

A panoramic view showing the interior of the leasehold before demolition

This panoramic view shows the interior of the leasehold before demolition. All interior walls and fixtures are to be removed during demolition.

The building has 18-foot clear ceilings throughout, and has the infrastructure in place for large, 14′ overhead doors in the rear, substantial water and gas lines, and the capability for 600 A of 3-phase electrical, which are major requirements for a brewery and kitchen of our planned scale. The building also has two large HVAC units that we will use to keep the dining room comfortable in spite of the heat from window exposure, brewing and kitchen activities. Currently there are no windows or doors on the north wall of the space, and very few on the west wall, which turns out to be the result of storefronts being closed in at some point in the past. We plan to open up these existing storefronts and reuse as many of them as possible, making the space bright and airy. As shown in the artist’s rendering at the top of this article, we hope to replace some of these storefronts with windowed rollup doors, allowing for a patio vibe during the warm months, budget permitting.

Location Concept Plan

Preliminary Brewpub Floorplan

The preliminary floor plan for the Prairie Dog Brewpub, north at left. Tables and games in this view are placeholders and are unlikely to reflect our final seating layout.

Restaurant Area

Dining Room and Games Area

The brewpub will feature a games area and a mix of communal and standard tables.

Space will be split between the restaurant and brewing operations such that the restaurant is somewhat larger than the brewery. The restaurant is a focal point of our business and we wanted to make sure that guests are comfortable and don’t have long waits for tables. There are no bad seats in the house — seats have clear sight-lines into the kitchen, brewing operations, and bar. We will have a mixture of communal and traditional high- and low-top tables in the restaurant, with quite a number of seats surrounding the bar. The entire space will allow minors, and we will have high chairs and baby changing stations on site. Our floor plan allows for as many as 280 seats within our footprint, but to limit occupancy and ensure that parking isn’t overused, we plan on deploying pods of comfy couches, games, and a large merchandise area (we will have awesome merch), which will consume a lot of square footage and cut seating down to around 200. We will sprinkle USB charging outlets throughout the space to allow patrons to charge devices.

Prairie Dog Brewpub Bar Detail View.

This 3D artist’s rendering of the Prairie Dog Brewpub bar shows the scale of the bar relative to the dining room. The kitchen is visible in the background.

The bar will be a focal point at the centre of the restaurant area, and will include about thirty comfortable seats spread over three sides, with a growler fill station on the corner nearest the entrance (YES, we will fill growlers!). The bar will feature about 16 beer faucets with a mix of rotating/seasonal beers and full-time staples, as well as up to four guest taps for things like ciders, meads, or other awesome beer that we want to share with the community. We will also offer a limited selection of locally produced spirits and wines to ensure that non beer-lovers still have options. We plan to include some televisions, which will be visible from the bar area, but strategically located to minimize distraction to patrons at the periphery of the dining room (we are aiming for a conversation-friendly atmosphere, and feel that too many TVs can detract from that).

Nine bathrooms will be located behind the kitchen at the east end of the dining room. All bathrooms will be unisex with insulated, fully-enclosed rooms, with two being handicapped-accessible.

Brewery Area

I’m excited about the possibilities that our restaurant and brewery scale afford me; I can design a beer without fear or compromise because I have confidence that we can sell 10 barrels of any high-quality beer offered in our restaurant. Gerad Coles, Founder/Brewmaster

Brewery View from Restaurant Over Half Wall

View into the brewery wet area from the dining room, over the pony wall. Fermentation tanks on the left and brewhouse on the right.

We located the core brewing operations directly beside the restaurant seating area and plan to separate them with only a short pony wall, so that patrons will be able to see and interact with us while we are brewing, which we think will help remind customers that they are actually hanging out in an active brewery (like at Cold Garden). We have purchased a 10-barrel (2,400 half-litre pints) brewhouse made by Specific Mechanical out of Victoria, BC. Most of the brewpubs that inspired us to start this business got their start on a similar system, which offers a good compromise between frequency of brewing and ability to brew a lot of small/unique batches, with the brewpub bar being our major customer. As Brewmaster, I’m excited about the possibilities that our restaurant and brewery scale afford me; I can design a beer without fear or compromise because I have confidence that we can sell 10 barrels of any high-quality beer offered in our restaurant.

I’m excited to have the opportunity to set up our lab, which will be key to bringing high-quality, consistent beer to our customers. Sarah Goertzen, Founder/Director of Quality

We plan to start with a quality lab, which will be managed by our founder and Director of Quality, Sarah Goertzen, an analytical chemist and member of the American Society of Brewing Chemists (ASBC). Quality labs are not common in small breweries in our fledgling market, but we believe that starting with a culture of quality will ensure consistency or continual improvement in our beer lineup and help build brand loyalty and longevity, particularly as the market becomes more crowded.

I’m excited about all the space we have at the old St John’s Music; it let us lay out the brewery just how I wanted – highly efficient, with room for growth, and with most brewery operations close to our guests, allowing them to see beer made up close, and giving me someone to talk to while brewing. Cheers! Tyler Potter, Founder/Head Brewer

Our brewery is designed with growth in mind — we plan to be able to add cellar capacity for quite a long time at this location. Our cellar will initially consist of four 20-barrel unitank fermenters, which will allow us to brew up to about 200 batches a year (about 2,400 hectolitres). We have planned to support one additional fermenter in our brewery wet area (with sloped, epoxy-coated floors and drainage), but are setting up the infrastructure to allow us to expand the wet area to the east, effectively doubling our fermentation capacity and/or allowing us to build a large visible cooperage of barrels. Instead of using glycol-cooled, jacketed brite tanks to chill and clarify our beer, we will have a large walk-in beer cooler that includes six 20-barrel serving tanks and keg storage. Beer faucets will be fed by a flexible arrangement directly from serving tanks and/or kegs like you would find at many great brewpubs worldwide. We plan on selling some of our beer to the wholesale market, so will have a large keg inventory to support that as well as our own uses in the pub.

Kitchen Area

Our kitchen will always be in co-operation mode with the brewery, communication and collaboration will be an essential part of how we operate. Our brewery and kitchen pass are directly across the hall and open to each other to encourage communication and help maintain close ties between our Chef and our Brewmaster.

So often when designing restaurants the kitchen is treated as an afterthought. It is designed as a workshop in which to efficiently pump out as many meals as possible while allowing more space in the dining room for more tables to turn over and increase profits. It’s often a place where you’re working elbow to elbow in tight spaces with your fellow cooks. We are starting with a clean slate at this location, which has enabled us to design a kitchen that allows us to focus our menu on some key areas of popularity. We will have space devoted specifically to our smoker for brisket, ribs and pulled pork as well as separate spaces for our pizza production and storage for pickles and other fermentables.

Jay Potter, our Executive Chef and founder, is particularly excited about the potential of our kitchen to serve the large lunch crowd surrounding the location of our brewpub:

There is an enormous volume of local businesses and offices in the area that are currently being under-serviced during lunch hour. I know we can fill that need to have guests in and out in 45 minutes. Jay Potter, Founder/Executive Chef

Timeline for Open

As you can see, this is a massive space which will require significant demolition and construction. We have hired Leading Edge Developments as our prime contractor for the project, and are currently working with them to finalize our construction plan and file building permits. The folks at Leading Edge have plenty of restaurant build experience, with projects like Hayden Block, Fergus and Bix, and the recent Brewsters renovations under their belt. How long the project takes depends partially on how much investment we continue to raise, because additional capital avoids the need for us founders to do some of the construction ourselves (are you interested in investing in a cool local brewpub unlike anything Calgary’s ever seen? Check out our invest page!). Either way, it is safe to assume that you won’t be able to visit our brewpub until at least December 2017.

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